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Syntax

The Magic of Set Analysis – Point In Time Reporting

By |2019-07-15T11:00:19-05:00November 27th, 2010|Set Analysis, The Magic Of Set Analysis|

I have always believed that Set Analysis' Raison d'être is to satisfy a basic need in any BI Tool: the ability to perform "Point In Time" Analysis. But, needless to say, it is also amazingly useful for the fulfillment of a bunch of other special needs. In this post, I will cover the specifics of Point In Time Reporting with Set Analysis.

The Magic of Set Analysis – Part III

By |2019-05-25T16:30:50-05:00November 21st, 2010|Set Analysis, The Magic Of Set Analysis, Uncategorized|

In Part II of The Series, I wrote about the general syntax of a Set Expression and provided some basic examples using Set Modifiers with explicit field value definitions. Now, our next step will be about making our desired record set dynamic and based on the user's current selections, that is, using an Implicit field value definition.

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